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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, looking to buy an Astra G Diesel but can't decide on which one. I believe the 1.7 DTI is considered to be the most reliable and seems to be the most numerous. Every once in a while I see an ECO4 model for sale, the lower tax is a nice bonus but curious if there is anything otherwise good or bad about them vs the standard model. I believe they have lowered suspension and different gear ratios amongst other things. If anyone has any experience of them I'm curious to know if they are any more economical in the real world, especially on the motorway, or if any parts (lowered suspension being an example) are difficult to find/expensive vs the standard model. 2.0 DTI is also appealing but seems very rare. Any advice appreciated.
 

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Stick to standard 1.7DTI engine.
Fairly reliable but do suffer a few issues.
EDU on fuel pump can fail causing engine not to run until fixed.
MAF’s fail leading to frequent cutting out of engine & sluggish performance.
Temperature gauge sender units fail regularly leading to loss of temperature reading from gauge.
Oil coolers fail & leak copious amounts of oil into the coolant system.
Fuel injection seals leak causing fuel to mix with oil in the sump if really bad.
Oil seal on oil pump can fail leaking oil all over Cam Belt.
Oil pump sprocket can work loose ( needs checking on Cam Belt change )
All these faults are fixable though.
Any 1.7 DTI that doesn’t start as soon as you show it the ignition key has issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Stick to standard 1.7DTI engine.
Fairly reliable but do suffer a few issues.
EDU on fuel pump can fail causing engine not to run until fixed.
MAF’s fail leading to frequent cutting out of engine & sluggish performance.
Temperature gauge sender units fail regularly leading to loss of temperature reading from gauge.
Oil coolers fail & leak copious amounts of oil into the coolant system.
Fuel injection seals leak causing fuel to mix with oil in the sump if really bad.
Oil seal on oil pump can fail leaking oil all over Cam Belt.
Oil pump sprocket can work loose ( needs checking on Cam Belt change )
All these faults are fixable though.
Any 1.7 DTI that doesn’t start as soon as you show it the ignition key has issues.
Thanks Fred, I've read of the EDU and oil pump sprocket issues and believe I could deal with them. The rest is news to me but nothing sounds too scary.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Anyone out there have any experience of how the three different models (1.7 vs ECO4 vs 2.0) drive. I'm interested in how the gearing is and the real world performance and economy. Cheers.
 

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I would stick to the standard DTI. The 2.0 are virtually obsolete now, and I would think the ECO4 version would be harder to find parts for.
In my experience, the Astra H 1.7 CDTI is a nicer car, and normally very reliable.
Don't forget, the newest Astra G is at least 15 years old, and Astra H at least 9 years old!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would stick to the standard DTI. The 2.0 are virtually obsolete now, and I would think the ECO4 version would be harder to find parts for.
In my experience, the Astra H 1.7 CDTI is a nicer car, and normally very reliable.
Don't forget, the newest Astra G is at least 15 years old, and Astra H at least 9 years old!
Thanks for the reply Alan, that's my concern with the ECO4 models, I'm always wary of models that seem rare, especially at this stage in the game. I know the G is an old car now, and I can remember driving a 54 plate H as a brand new rental car, (1.7 CDTI 100) it was a nice car to be fair. I like the style (or lack) of the G and I'm partial to old school diesels, so it seems like the right fit. Besides I don't think that the budget will get me a H that's much newer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Slight change of topic, Alan got me thinking and I have been eyeballing a few Hs. Seems to be 4 versions of the 1.7CDTI available 80/100/110/110ecoflex. The latter 2 are going to be out of budget for sure, but am I right in thinking that the first 2 versions would be better anyway being 5 speed and if I've got this right DPF free?
 

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Yes your correct.
The 110 ecoflex versions have the 6 speed M32 gearbox & the Denso fuel management system plus DPF.
The 100 bhp version features Bosch fuel management system & a 5 speed gearbox , this version is the most reliable of the bunch & drives well.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Yes your correct.
The 110 ecoflex versions have the 6 speed M32 gearbox & the Denso fuel management system plus DPF.
The 100 bhp version features Bosch fuel management system & a 5 speed gearbox , this version is the most reliable of the bunch & drives well.
Thanks Fred, any idea what the cut off point would be for the 100 or were they simply on sale alongside the 110 until the demise of the H.
 

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The 80 bhp is no slouch when it comes to driving, also has the Bosch fuel system, and has the advantage of a solid flywheel, while the 100 bhp has a dual mass (I had to have the flywheel & clutch on mine changed back in the summer).
My son has had two 80 bhp Astra estates, and both have run to over 200,000 miles with little trouble. The first one developed an oil leak, and we got rid of that in an auction, the second went for scrap last month after he scraped the side on a wall, and a week later the gearbox broke. I'm still running my 100 bhp, which has now done around 160,000 miles. I regularly tow a caravan that weighs close to a ton with mine, and my son has towed my caravan with his car as well.
The 100 changed to the ecoflex 110 bhp in about 2009. I have no experience with the ecoflex, but it has a DPF, and, from what I have seen on the forum, doesn't seem as trouble free as the others.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The 80 bhp is no slouch when it comes to driving, also has the Bosch fuel system, and has the advantage of a solid flywheel, while the 100 bhp has a dual mass (I had to have the flywheel & clutch on mine changed back in the summer).
My son has had two 80 bhp Astra estates, and both have run to over 200,000 miles with little trouble. The first one developed an oil leak, and we got rid of that in an auction, the second went for scrap last month after he scraped the side on a wall, and a week later the gearbox broke. I'm still running my 100 bhp, which has now done around 160,000 miles. I regularly tow a caravan that weighs close to a ton with mine, and my son has towed my caravan with his car as well.
The 100 changed to the ecoflex 110 bhp in about 2009. I have no experience with the ecoflex, but it has a DPF, and, from what I have seen on the forum, doesn't seem as trouble free as the others.
Thanks for the info Alan, Nice bonus on the solid flywheel!
 

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Astra g eco4 comes in to flavours cdti 1.7 and dti.

Avoid the cdti in G!
As for dti is the same car engine gearbox with the normal dti but main differences are:

Lower co2 that reflects in 30£ roadtax

4th and 5th gears have different ratios( you will be very under reved in 4th under 52mph...) So better suited for motorway but no good if you want to tow a caravan.

Eco 4 runs on 175/80r14 or 175/75r14

Slightly lower chassis about 10-15mm
Rear spoiler specific to eco4 ( do not know if this has anything to do with the eco part)


Mpg difference is about 10 mpg in real life LS eco4 compared to the normal LS...

This are the differences..otherwise is the same car nothing different...

All 1.7 dti should have engine under trays and all have single mass flywheels...

Common faults: edu, crank sensor, pump timing solenoid leaking, oil cooler leaking oil in coolant and oil pump pulley nut coming loose( this fault is extinct by now ).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Astra g eco4 comes in to flavours cdti 1.7 and dti.

Avoid the cdti in G!
As for dti is the same car engine gearbox with the normal dti but main differences are:

Lower co2 that reflects in 30£ roadtax

4th and 5th gears have different ratios( you will be very under reved in 4th under 52mph...) So better suited for motorway but no good if you want to tow a caravan.

Eco 4 runs on 175/80r14 or 175/75r14

Slightly lower chassis about 10-15mm
Rear spoiler specific to eco4 ( do not know if this has anything to do with the eco part)


Mpg difference is about 10 mpg in real life LS eco4 compared to the normal LS...

This are the differences..otherwise is the same car nothing different...

All 1.7 dti should have engine under trays and all have single mass flywheels...

Common faults: edu, crank sensor, pump timing solenoid leaking, oil cooler leaking oil in coolant and oil pump pulley nut coming loose( this fault is extinct by now ).
Thanks for the info, don't like the sound of that gearing. I've driven other cars like that, were the choice for driving round town was over rev in 3rd or under rev in 4th.

Avoid the cdti in G!

Any particular reasons? Though must admit I'm a little sceptical on common rails in general.
 

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Thanks for the info, don't like the sound of that gearing. I've driven other cars like that, were the choice for driving round town was over rev in 3rd or under rev in 4th.

Avoid the cdti in G!

Any particular reasons? Though must admit I'm a little sceptical on common rails in general.
Why are you sceptical?
Common rail diesels are a revelation compared to the older type diesel chuggers.
Better more precise fuel delivery
Better acceleration
More low down torque for easier relaxed driving
Less emissions when compared to the old Diesel engines
More horse power from same size engine cc
Smoother running
What’s not to like ?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Why are you sceptical?
Common rail diesels are a revelation compared to the older type diesel chuggers.
Better more precise fuel delivery
Better acceleration
More low down torque for easier relaxed driving
Less emissions when compared to the old Diesel engines
More horse power from same size engine cc
Smoother running
What’s not to like ?
I've absolutely no doubt that they drive better, more the thought of having to replace injectors that puts me off. I know rotary pump diesels are not immune to injector or pump issues, but seems less prevalent to me, but could be mistaken. DMF and variable turbo issues also seem to go hand in hand with common rails, doesn't have to happen and is not directly related of course. But would rather avoid the issues all together if possible.
 

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I've absolutely no doubt that they drive better, more the thought of having to replace injectors that puts me off. I know rotary pump diesels are not immune to injector or pump issues, but seems less prevalent to me, but could be mistaken. DMF and variable turbo issues also seem to go hand in hand with common rails, doesn't have to happen and is not directly related of course. But would rather avoid the issues all together if possible.
Most of the problems that people have with common rail diesels are down to people not understanding how they work, and not doing a logical diagnostic proceedure.
Too many people see a code for low rail pressure, for example, and straight away change the pressure sensor without thinking about why the pressure could actually be too low (could be a blocked filter, faulty SCV etc).
The reason that problems seem more prevalent with common rail diesels could be that the old type are dieing out rapidly.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Most of the problems that people have with common rail diesels are down to people not understanding how they work, and not doing a logical diagnostic proceedure.
Too many people see a code for low rail pressure, for example, and straight away change the pressure sensor without thinking about why the pressure could actually be too low (could be a blocked filter, faulty SCV etc).
The reason that problems seem more prevalent with common rail diesels could be that the old type are dieing out rapidly.
You make a very good point there Alan, I think that's an issue that relates to all problems on all cars now. Code readers have come down in price a lot and are now basically vital to fix even the cheapest and oldest car you are likely to buy. Issue is most people don't yet quite grasp that just because the code reader says P0400 egr flow excessive, that you don't necessarily need a new egr valve. Seen that one a lot whilst researching the 2.0 DTI engine. As I'm finding, the old type are thin on the ground now and most are at the point where I think the average owner would regard them as scrap in the face of a semi serious issue, current anti diesel rhetoric will not help this either. So maybe the faults are just no longer even talked about?
 

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You make a very good point there Alan, I think that's an issue that relates to all problems on all cars now. Code readers have come down in price a lot and are now basically vital to fix even the cheapest and oldest car you are likely to buy. Issue is most people don't yet quite grasp that just because the code reader says P0400 egr flow excessive, that you don't necessarily need a new egr valve. Seen that one a lot whilst researching the 2.0 DTI engine. As I'm finding, the old type are thin on the ground now and most are at the point where I think the average owner would regard them as scrap in the face of a semi serious issue, current anti diesel rhetoric will not help this either. So maybe the faults are just no longer even talked about?
The main criteria for getting the most out of your modern common rail diesel is to remember the following.
Regular full services with the correct oils & fluids is the key to keeping things running sweet.
Nothing keeps things running & lasting longer than good old fashioned on time regular services.
We’ve proved that on the taxi fleet over the years with some cars doing over 600,000 miles on the original engine , original turbocharger , original injectors etc ( all common rail diesel )
From my experience of running cars to big mileages other than regular servicing the other main thing is to not sit on too many repairs for too long that could affect other components reliability.
Then the final piece in the jigsaw that really does make the difference to reliability & help keep the surprises at bay is the vital weekly checks under the bonnet , getting to know your engine & it’s various components is the key.
It’s a habit that’s saved me many a serious issue developing & causing major damage.
 
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Discussion Starter #20
The main criteria for getting the most out of your modern common rail diesel is to remember the following.
Regular full services with the correct oils & fluids is the key to keeping things running sweet.
Nothing keeps things running & lasting longer than good old fashioned on time regular services.
We’ve proved that on the taxi fleet over the years with some cars doing over 600,000 miles on the original engine , original turbocharger , original injectors etc ( all common rail diesel )
From my experience of running cars to big mileages other than regular servicing the other main thing is to not sit on too many repairs for too long that could affect other components reliability.
Then the final piece in the jigsaw that really does make the difference to reliability & help keep the surprises at bay is the vital weekly checks under the bonnet , getting to know your engine & it’s various components is the key.
It’s a habit that’s saved me many a serious issue developing & causing major damage.
Servicing is often neglected these days, i know plenty of people that top up the oil when the light comes on and the like. Personally though I tend to keep up on maintenance and doubtless it's worth it overall. You reminded me of some of the Taxis I saw in Greece recently, Vectra C 2.0 DTI 714,000, and Octavia mk1 TDI 999,850. Some maintenance must have gone into those to keep them going.
 
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