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Club Barge
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Running temps on the V6

A popular question.

The V6 does run hot, plus the gauge is overly accurate and can scare you!!. So long as you have a good coolant mixture (clean and flushed) and the water pump is healthy, the car will run within the following ranges.

95 degrees - Thermostat Opens , fans on slow
104 degrees - Thermostat fully opened, fans on high

Once it his 104, the fans will bring things back down very quickly. If you're worried, turn off the A/C and open a window, the temp will drop quickly as the condensor will not be getting hot, which can affect things slightly.
 

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Club Barge
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Running problems on the 2.0 at part throttle

If you have a slight problem at part throttle on your 2.0 Ecotec, it's likely you have a problem with your EGR. You can blank it off, or replace. Emission levels should be un-affected if blanked, you'll just be producing more NOx, which isn't tested on UK MOT's. Throttle response may be slightly improved, but don't get too excited :).
 

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2 Posts
Any ideas how to shut the Air Injection exhast flap on my Omega ?

The flap stays open and lets the exhaust gas out and overheats the engine
 

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Club Barge
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Alarm goes off with Windows or sunroof open

Perfectly normal behaviour, press the ultrasonics disablement button on the dash before locking the car, it usually has a red led that flashes once you press it.

Alarm goes off at other times, randomly

Couple of main reasons.

1 - Faulty underbonnet switch
2 - Internal batteries in the alarm unit are failing, they alert you to failure by causing the alarm to squark as you alarm of disarm the car.
 

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Club Barge
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Reverse lights not working

If a clean up of the selector switch does not work, or you don't fancy getting dirty under the car, take a look at the wiring as it entered the boot lid from the car. It is not unknown for the wires to break and go brittle with age.

Thanks to SRi for suggesting the fault, and ToySR for confirming this was the case with his car. As early Omegas get older, I think this'll become more common.
 

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67 Posts
Many thanks for all your good advice.
Couple of pointers that may be useful for anyone attempting a cam belt change on a V6.
Firstly is this a DIY job?
I would say yes – The only ‘not so usual tools’ you need is a set of torque sockets, torque wrench that will adjust down to 20 nm, 30 mm ring spanner and of course the Cam Timing Tool. The most difficult bit was removing the two bolts from the Aux Belt tensioner. Took an afternoon and a morning to complete with an oil change and a set of plugs done at the same time.
Things to consider
1. Take a few pictures with a digital camera. There are many bits that need to be removed. It will help you put it all back together again.
2. Marks on the new belt which are there to help you locate the belt in the correct position over the cam and crank pulleys are not as straightforward as it reads in the manual. I used the Gates Belt which fits a number of different vehicles. It had two sets of marks, one yellow and other white. I eventually worked out that the first two sets of yellow marks are for the crank and one & two cams and the three & four cams are aligned using the second set of white marks.
3. Mine is a late 2003 model. The bottom guide pulley has no adjustment for timing cams three & four – earler engines have an adjustable pully - I still checked the timing marks and they were within .5 of a mm.
4. Make sure you get the right belt for the job. There are at least three different types.
5. Make sure that you adequately tighten the tensioner pulleys in between making your timing adjustments. Mine slipped and one of the cams jumped a couple of teeth – a scary moment as each cam gear has multiple timing marks and on first inspection it wasn’t clear which way the cam had spun round. As it turned out the cams are each stamped with numbers so you know which mark to use on each of the cams
6. As advised above change the water pump –
7. For added peace of mind I used a little lock-tight on the pulley bolts and tensioner nut as well as torquing them up correctly.
Anyone interested in attempting a DIY cam belt change I will loan out my new Cam Timing Tool if a suitable deposit is left.
 

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What is the paperclip test I keep reading about?

On petrol engined Vauxhalls up to approx 1999 you could flash out fault codes stored by the ECU. If your orange engine management light (EML) came on for more than a few seconds, it would mean there was a fault code stored.

Here is how to do it on the Omega.

Try doing this with the engine running if possible (to avoid a false code for crank sensor). Not always possible, sometimes it will only work with just the igntion on.

The diagnostic port (the thing that Vauxhall will use with a tech II reader and charge a small fortune for the same information!) is under the steering wheel, on the left hand side. Undo the catch and you will see lots of fuses on the right, and the the diagnostic port on the left. It is mounted vertically and has 16 pins.

You need to short pins 4 and 6. This is where the "paper clip" comes in useful, although any piece of wire will do.

Pin 1 is located top right as you look at it. Pin 2 is directly below, then pin 3, pin 4 etc.

This will cause the EML to start flashing. Don't panic if you don't catch the number of flashes the first time.
Each code is repeated 3 times.
Once it has completed the cycle, it will start again.

First code is always 1 flash, pause, 2 flashes = 12. Diagnostic startup.

A full list of the codes and their meaning can be found here:
http://www.topbuzz.co.uk/info/fault_codes/fault_codes.htm

What ecu does my Omega have?

You need to know this so you can read the results properly.

2.0 4 cylinder Omegas have the Siemens Simtec 56.0/56.1 ecu
2.5 & 3.0 6 cylinder Omegas have the Bosch Motronic 2.8.1/2.8.3 ecu.

Once you have your results, post them up on the forum and we will advise. :)

Please note: After 1999 the chipsets were altered so it was no longer possible to flash the codes out this way.
please can anyone help, my 2.2cd omega started running really badly, no power, power dying etc, we changed the cam sensor but still no joy, an auto electrition tested everything and said the ecu had blown, we changed that at a great expense but still no joy, up to press we have changed the ecu, the throttle body the cam sensor and the throttle pedal, the car starts and ticks over but will not rev, i have now spent over £1000 on this car and i'm at my wits end, please please please can you help.
thanks steve
 

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i need urgent help on my 2.5 v6 omega on a p reg, i've changed the fuel pump but can't find any thread post due to not starting or no power going to the pump, i don't wanna get rid off the car as it was reliable. :(
 

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Club Barge
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3,467 Posts


Not comprehensive, but hope it helps. I am not certain myself where the coolant temp sensor is, but....look around the thermostat housing, all the cars I have seen, (Omega V6's, Jag straight AJ6's, Rover engine etc) seem to have the sensor on, or around this area, it would be the first place I would look. The lambda probe sits in the exhaust down pipe, not sure if the 2.2 has more than one though. Crank angle sensor is a bugger to get to, I had to remove my exhaust heat shield, and the left hand side main engine mount in order to get to it. This sounds scary, but isn't too bad. However, nimble hands can get to the sensor from the top, by touch. 2.2 engine bay may differ slightly.
 

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7 Posts
Hi. I tryed this with the paper clip, and after the first *-**, then it cam *********-** 9 pause 2.
anyone who knows what that code is?
bror
What is the paperclip test I keep reading about?

On petrol engined Vauxhalls up to approx 1999 you could flash out fault codes stored by the ECU. If your orange engine management light (EML) came on for more than a few seconds, it would mean there was a fault code stored.

Here is how to do it on the Omega.

Try doing this with the engine running if possible (to avoid a false code for crank sensor). Not always possible, sometimes it will only work with just the igntion on.

The diagnostic port (the thing that Vauxhall will use with a tech II reader and charge a small fortune for the same information!) is under the steering wheel, on the left hand side. Undo the catch and you will see lots of fuses on the right, and the the diagnostic port on the left. It is mounted vertically and has 16 pins.

You need to short pins 4 and 6. This is where the "paper clip" comes in useful, although any piece of wire will do.

Pin 1 is located top right as you look at it. Pin 2 is directly below, then pin 3, pin 4 etc.

This will cause the EML to start flashing. Don't panic if you don't catch the number of flashes the first time.
Each code is repeated 3 times.
Once it has completed the cycle, it will start again.

First code is always 1 flash, pause, 2 flashes = 12. Diagnostic startup.

A full list of the codes and their meaning can be found here:
http://www.topbuzz.co.uk/info/fault_codes/fault_codes.htm

What ecu does my Omega have?

You need to know this so you can read the results properly.

2.0 4 cylinder Omegas have the Siemens Simtec 56.0/56.1 ecu
2.5 & 3.0 6 cylinder Omegas have the Bosch Motronic 2.8.1/2.8.3 ecu.

Once you have your results, post them up on the forum and we will advise. :)

Please note: After 1999 the chipsets were altered so it was no longer possible to flash the codes out this way.
 
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