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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1.7 CDTI Combo that for the past 2 years as had advisiories for both rear and 1 front brake pipe 'Brake pipe corroded, covered in grease or other material' I just assumed someone had covered them in grease. It is due its MOT again in a few weeks, so decided to take a proper look and they are a bit dirty with mud and the plastic green coating flaking off, a little rusty.

The main 2 runs from front to back look ok, they are a bit more protected from the elements, I have taken some pics, I was going to sand and spray with hammerite but I'm not sure if these need replacing or not. What do you think? I did try and wire brush, lightly sand one.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I need to replace both the below also as these look a bit manky, will a garage just replace the bad sections and join into good pipe? the n/s has the bit below and then around 1ft from the flexi to a join, while the right side goes from the flexi all the way to the front. What kind of price would a garage charge? I usually do my own repairs but have never done brake pipes before.
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ask at the mot place, they may do repairs, an independent garage not a dealer, who knows on price 🤷‍♂️ that depends on how posh the garage is :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
 

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Those pipes in the photos need replacing.
If you're not sure about doing them, leave it to a garage.
It's worth asking the garage that does the MOT if they can replace them.
If they will do the job, then leave it till the MOT test, in case there is more that needs doing as well (you might decide it's not worth repairing).
Don't forget, you can have your van tested up to a month prior to the old MOT expiring, without losing the remaining time on the certificate. The earliest date you can get it tested without losing the remaining time is on the old certificate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If I had the time I would probably attempt them myself, however I am working 6 days a week and need the van on the road. So I can't afford for anything to go wrong as my car is off the road atm, some simple jobs can turn into nightmares. I have a garage who is going to take a look and price tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Had a quote for £170 not including the cost of the rear sections in the image in post 3, they are around £45 for both so all in would be £215. That's to change the 2 rear sections which come premade with the flexi hoses and then to put in 2 new sections of approx 6ft each brake pipe. The 2 long runs have joins near the front so looks a simple job, what do you think about the price?
 

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seams well over priced, but then like i said, all depends where ya live and who ya take it too.
 

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If that price includes the parts and brake fluid that's only about 3 hours labour at country garage prices.
So, knowing the problems that can happen when you get into bleeding brakes, I wouldn't have thought it's too expensive.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah the £215 will include the parts, I'm tempted to do it myself though now. I have had a read up and would use kunifer pipe but what's confusing is the flares and what type to use, some people say not to use male and female fittings when joining copper to copper/steel and to use a brake pipe connector, other say it's fine lol.

I want would want to do it the best and safest way, I would run new pipe from the flexis at the back to the 2 connectors near the front which are a male/female fitting and steel pipe, I presume if I use a proper brake pipe connector with 2 male ends, then it's a double flare on the copper? and the same for the ends that go into the flexis? only thing I don't like is those brass connectors look bulky.
 

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You must use flared connectors on brake pipes, with the proper nuts (not brass connectors), due to the pressures involved.
If you haven't got a flaring tool, you will either have to buy or borrow one, or get the pipes off and get someone to make the pipes for you.
If you are at all confused, then spend the money at the garage, it's important to get brakes right!
 
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Those pipes in the photos need replacing.
If you're not sure about doing them, leave it to a garage.
It's worth asking the garage that does the MOT if they can replace them.
If they will do the job, then leave it till the MOT test, in case there is more that needs doing as well (you might decide it's not worth repairing).
Don't forget, you can have your van tested up to a month prior to the old MOT expiring, without losing the remaining time on the certificate. The earliest date you can get it tested without losing the remaining time is on the old certificate.
That doesn't work if you are failed for something considered dangerous, as corroded pipes would be.
 

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That doesn't work if you are failed for something considered dangerous, as corroded pipes would be.
Yes it does still work. If your vehicle fails for something classed as dangerous, of course you should not use it until it is fixed (as it could invalidate your insurance and/or leave you open to prosecution), but it doesn't stop you having the expiry date extended when it passes.
There are so many misconceptions about MOT testing it is worrying. Don't forget, the MOT test is the MINIMUM standard of roadworthiness, not a once a year high point, all vehicles should be able to pass at any time.
 

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Yes it does still work. If your vehicle fails for something classed as dangerous, of course you should not use it until it is fixed (as it could invalidate your insurance and/or leave you open to prosecution), but it doesn't stop you having the expiry date extended when it passes.
There are so many misconceptions about MOT testing it is worrying. Don't forget, the MOT test is the MINIMUM standard of roadworthiness, not a once a year high point, all vehicles should be able to pass at any time.
Yes, you're absolutely right. I just meant that you can't drive it until it's fixed.

Yeah, too many people forget that, the amount of bald tyres and blown lights you see is just terrible. The reduction in traffic policing must take a lot of the blame.
 

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One of your photos has some rust which reckon would end up as a hole if you scraped it out?
Might be worth some work with the pipe out the way...............
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One of your photos has some rust which reckon would end up as a hole if you scraped it out?
Might be worth some work with the pipe out the way...............
That was why I said leave doing the pipes until it's tested, no point spending money and then finding it's not worth doing other repairs. (Post #5)
 

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The bit to the right of the circled part looks even worse, the pipe looks like it has narrowed.
I had a pipe on the Corsa burst on the MoT because it had rotted away. Fortunately the tester agreed to bend the end of the pipe over to seal it and I drove home without using the foot brake. Made a new pipe up and took it back the next day.
 
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